connecting

Devon and Somerset

Faster broadband is on its way
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  • Latest news

    • UK Umbrella State Aid Granted by European Commission

      Broadband Delivery UK (the organisation responsible for delivering the £52 million of public funding for the Connecting Devon and Somerset Project) has been granted State Aid* clearance by the European Commission. This allows Broadband Delivery UK (BDUK) to approve local

    • BT Appointed Preferred Bidder for the Connecting Devon and Somerset Programme

      The Connecting Devon and Somerset (CDS) programme has announced that it has appointed BT as preferred bidder for the provision of superfast broadband across Devon and Somerset. The next stage of the project involves undertaking due diligence on the tender

    • Procurement Update

      As part of satisfying State Aid requirements, Connecting Devon and Somerset (CDS) is required to announce the launch of its invitation to tender (ITT) for the selection of its chosen supplier from the recent Framework arrangement set up by BDUK.

Latest News

I currently pay for a service that says I should get up to 10Mbps but I only get 2Mbps, why is that?

One of the problems with purchasing broadband, especially ADSL broadband delivered over copper, is that your supplier cannot guarantee that you will get a particular speed. There are a number of different factors that affect the speed of your broadband connection. For example, the speed will be reduced by your distance from the telephone exchange, the quality of the line, the number of joints in the wire, and the wiring inside your house. Also, the connection will be made at the Maximum Stable Rate (MSR), which is the lowest rate where the line isn’t dropped occasionally. It’s not the highest speed the line can actually deliver. The broadband router can also make a difference as can your laptop or computer or some of the software you use.

The distance from the telephone exchange is the length of the wiring involved, not the direct distance. A user could be within a stone’s throw of the exchange but too far away for ADSL, for example if the exchange is on the other side of a river or railway line. The quality of the line includes what it’s made from. For example, aluminium is notoriously slower than copper wiring for ADSL.

Beyond that, your throughput may be limited by something called ‘contention’. Broadband and telephone services are supplied on the same basis as other utilities such as water, mains electricity and roads, which assume that not everybody will want to use them at once. If everybody in your town decided to run a bath at the same time, your water supply would soon reduce to a trickle. The same thing will happen if everybody wants to use the internet at the same time.

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