connecting

Devon and Somerset

Faster broadband is on its way
  • Sign up for our newsletter
  • Share this page:


  • Latest news

    • UK Umbrella State Aid Granted by European Commission

      Broadband Delivery UK (the organisation responsible for delivering the £52 million of public funding for the Connecting Devon and Somerset Project) has been granted State Aid* clearance by the European Commission. This allows Broadband Delivery UK (BDUK) to approve local

    • BT Appointed Preferred Bidder for the Connecting Devon and Somerset Programme

      The Connecting Devon and Somerset (CDS) programme has announced that it has appointed BT as preferred bidder for the provision of superfast broadband across Devon and Somerset. The next stage of the project involves undertaking due diligence on the tender

    • Procurement Update

      As part of satisfying State Aid requirements, Connecting Devon and Somerset (CDS) is required to announce the launch of its invitation to tender (ITT) for the selection of its chosen supplier from the recent Framework arrangement set up by BDUK.

Latest News

What does download and upload mean?

When you connect to the internet, the download speed is the pace at which data (websites, programmes, music etc) is transferred from another computer to yours. Currently, when it comes to home broadband, advertised download speeds range from 8 Mbps to 100 Mbps, but this is rising at a pretty quick rate and you can expect a broadband download speed of between 120 Mbps and 200 Mbps to become commonplace across the UK over the next few years.

Upload speed on the other hand is the speed at which data (such as your new holiday pictures and videos) is uploaded to the internet – perhaps to put onto a social networking site such as Facebook, or onto a file-sharing site such as Flickr or to a photo print ordering company’s website. Essentially, the upload is going in the opposite direction to the download – from your computer to someone else’s.

Broadband upload speeds are generally much slower than download speeds. The reason for this is that people generally do far more downloading than uploading, so downloading is given priority by the ISPs (who regulate how their networks deal with the various traffic that is competing to be sent across the ether). Upload speeds become more important to someone who needs to transfer large files from their own computer to another computer in a different geographic area. For example, someone who works from home and wants to exchange files with a remote network, or people who play a lot of online games.

Previous page

 
Beta feedback
Beta